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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-is-glass-transparent-mark-miodownik

If you look through your glasses, binoculars or a window, you see the world on the other side. How is it that something so solid can be so invisible? Mark Miodownik melts the scientific secret behind amorphous solids.

Lesson by Mark Miodownik, animation by Provincia Studio.

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