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Many musicians prefer these 300-year-old instruments, but are they actually worth it?

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Antonio Stradivari is generally considered the greatest violin maker of all time. His violins are played by some of the top musicians in the world and sell for as much as $16 million. For centuries people have puzzled over what makes his violins so great and they are the most scientifically studied instruments in history. I spoke to two world class violinists who play Stradivarius violins as well as a violin-maker about what makes Stradivari so great.


Special thanks to Stefan Avalos for the Stradivari research footage.

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